Bruchim HaBaim! Welcome!

Jewish law puts a premium on protecting life.  While I continue to perform this important ritual, I am implementing a number of measures to protect you as well as me from COVID-19. I have been requiring that only parents and grandparents and/or the sandek attend a bris in person, with adults and older children wearing face masks.  Other guests are encouraged to join by Zoom.  So far most clergy have opted for participating by Zoom as well. You should check with your rabbi if you are affiliated with a congregation.  

The silver lining of this situation is that friends and family from far away can join in and be present.  I think that going forward we will use video platforms more regularly to include those far away.

Mazal tov on the (impending) birth of your son, and congratulations on your interest in Brit Milah (Jewish ritual circumcision, also called bris). Allow me accompany you as you welcome your son into your family and into the Jewish people. This website contains information that will help guide you from the moment you decide to have a bris for your son, through the ceremony, and afterwards.

The ritual of Brit Milah (newborn ritual circumcision) is one of the central commandments of Judaism. Brit Milah involves circumcision as it is done in the hospital–with anesthesia and sterile technique–but in the context of a religious ceremony. Of course, you expect someone of the utmost skill and experience to perform your son’s bris. At the same time, you want someone who is caring, gentle, and eager to work with you to create a personalized and memorable ceremony. I am a family physician who has performed newborn circumcisions for over 20 years, and I am committed to doing everything I can to make your Brit Milah a wonderful experience.

If you have questions about Brit Milah that are not fully addressed here, please feel free to contact me through the website or by phone. My cell phone is (612) 860-0176.